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Precursor
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©GeoSeismic Labs 2005.


Volume 4, Issue No. 366

Graphic: Map of West Coast Volcanoes
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GeoSeismic Labs Reports: Early Edition

All information reported here is based upon data collection and analysis using procedures that are considered "experimental" and might be of a shocking nature to some individuals. Read and use at your own risk!

SAN JACINTO FAULT ALERT: Wrightwood to Anza, CA





Mount St. Helens Eruption Update:

U.S. Geological Survey, Vancouver, Washington
University of Washington, Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network, Seattle, Washington

Mount St. Helens Volcano, December 31, 2004 10:50 a.m. PST (1850 UTC)

Current status is Volcano Advisory (Alert Level 2); aviation color code ORANGE


The Latest Eruption Update for the Unrest at Mt. Saint Helens, WA

Definition of Alert Levels

Mount St. Helens Satellite Imagery

For additional information, background, images, and other graphics, please visit:

Pacific Northwest Seismic Network

Caution: You may need to refresh the displayed page in order to view the latest live Volcano-Webcam.

Graphic: Mt. Saint Helens Webcam
Graphic: Popocatepetl Volcano  Webcam


Links to Phenomena Associated with Earthquakes Worldwide

Earthquake Lights: Kobe Earthquake in Japan 1995

(Tidal)Triggering Factor of Strong Earthquakes and Its Prediction Verification

Tidal Triggering: Caught in the Act

Recent Infrasonics Associated with Deep
Crustal Resonant Frequency Activity along
the Pacific and North American Plate Boundary

Graphic:(AE)Infrasonic Spectrogram
Mega-Quake Map




Graphic: Map of Rupture Zone

Eastern California Shear Zone
CA/NV Border/Eastern Sierras/Yellowstone
Tectonic and Volcanic Activity

How Volcanoes Work

Yellowstone Swarm Report: 2004

Volcanoes of Canada

The Long Valley Caldera: White Mountains Region

Living With a Restless Caldera:Long Valley, California

Future Eruptions in California's Long Valley Area--What's Likely

Adobe Hills Volcanic Field

Summary of Holocene eruptive activity and probable greatest hazards from future eruptions at volcanic centers in California

Eruptions from the Inyo chain about 600 Years ago: sequence of events and effects in the Long Valley Area

Long Valley Tilt Meters

Photo Gallery of the Long Valley area, California

ERS radar interferometry reveals strain transient in the Eastern California Shear Zone

Lithospheric Dynamics and Continental Deformation

USGS California Tiled 2 Degree Maps

USGS California Quarternary Fault and Fold Database Maps

Graphic: Map of Nevada Volcanoes Graphic: Map of Volcanic Hazard Zones for California

Giant Earthquakes Beneath Canada's West Coast

The role of stress transfer in earthquake occurrence

The San Andreas Fault system through the Transverse Ranges as illuminated by earthquakes

Graphic: General Location Map of the Long Valley area, California

San Jacinto Fault Zone Advisory
GeoSeismic Labs of California
Hesperia, California




(Click here to view MT ULF REPORTS published in October 2004)



(Click here to view MT ULF REPORTS published in November 2004)



(Click here to view MT ULF REPORTS published in December 2004)



MT ULF UPDATE: December 1, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a period with deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.59 hz (-71.59 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. Tonight, there was a small seismic swarm epicentered within the Coso Volcanic Center.

M3.0 2004/12/02 00:49:11 36.617 -121.225 7.3 12 km ( 7 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA
M3.3 2004/12/02 04:59:33 36.616 -121.222 7.0 12 km ( 7 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 2, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was no periods with detected deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy. However, geomagnetic oscillation was observed for a long period of time immediately after a micro quake epicentered along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary in Northern Baja, Mexico.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 3, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a period with deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.87 hz (-73.32 dBv) for Northern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. Today, I detected several periods with strong geomagnetic oscillation that appear to also be associated with micro quake epicentered along the Transverse Range from near Malibu, Fontana, Yucaipa, and Mt. San Gorgonio, CA. I usually associate strong oscillation with being a precursor for a significant magnitude earthquake of at least M5.0 to M6.5 according to past data from the Gulf of California, and that which preceded last year's M6.5 San Simeon seismic event. Most likely inferring that deep crustal stress will stay high over the next couple of weeks, especially during the coming high spring tides (Dec. 11-13). The new moon may add enough extra stress to have another strong earthquake along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary before the end of 2004. A quick analysis of all recent local anomalies would tend to agree with this. All charts are in sync with something building up for the near future. Also, the recent sustained MT peak reading indicates that stress is now rapidly increasing with time.

M3.4 2004/12/04 05:39:35 35.943 -120.489 11.1 7 km ( 4 mi) NW of Parkfield, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 4, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.07 hz (-69.63 dBv) for (ECSZ) Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. Today, I detected several periods with decompression (unclamping) which appear to be indicating that the increase in crustal stress is now causing the secondary faults to react. The recent small earthquake near Ludlow appears to be an excellent example of this effect. An extremely strong unclamping occurred at about the same time as that of the peak resonant harmonic making it perfectly clear that we're quickly approching some very important changes for in the near future.

M3.1 2004/12/05 00:06:02 UT 34.697N 116.373W d:3.7 km ( 12 mi) W of Ludlow, CA
M4.3 2004/12/05 01:48:04 UT 40.740N 123.802W d:18.9 km ( 13 mi) SSW of Willow Creek, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 5, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 0.88 hz (-68.44 dBv) for Northern Baja and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. Today, I detected another long period with decompression (unclamping) from along the plate boundary. Tonight's small earthquake epicentered south of the border in Baja appears to be latitudinally associated with the infrasonic harmonic detected. The arrival of a solar shockwave apparently triggered a micro quake in a region SW of Mammoth Lakes known as Red Cones.

M3.6 2004/12/06 06:08:42 UT 32.206N 116.121W d:5.6 km ( 37 mi) NE of Ensenada, Mexico


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 6, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.83 hz (-73.17 dBv) for Northern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary.

M3.1 2004/12/06 20:32:17 38.835 -122.751 0.7 3 km ( 2 mi) W of Cobb, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 7, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. Today, there were no detected periods with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy. However, unclamping (decompression) was still very active during the early morning period.

M3.5 2004/12/07 20:54:45 UT 34.273N 119.684W d:7.0 km ( 10 mi) S of Santa Barbara, CA
M3.2 2004/12/08 04:24:50 36.893 -121.629 7.2 1 km ( 1 mi) ENE of Aromas, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 8, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. Today, there were no detected periods with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy.

M3.1 2004/12/08 09:15:56 38.794 -122.760 2.5 4 km ( 3 mi) E of The Geysers, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 9, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.98 hz (-74.08 dBv) for Northern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. Several periods were detected which had strong unclamping.

M3.0 2004/12/09 09:01:11 UT 36.883N 121.617W d:6.8 km ( 1 mi) ESE of Aromas, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 10, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.54 hz (-70.56 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary.

M3.3 2004/12/10 10:49:29 32.160 -115.855 6.0 66 km ( 41 mi) SW of Mexicali, Mexico


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 11, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.95 hz (-74.16 dBv) for Northern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. There was an MT shift at approximately 23:32 UTC which was co-incident with the timing of a micro quake (23:32:01) preliminarily epicentered on The Elsinore fault near Glen Ivy Hot Springs, CA. It is inferred that crustal stress interaction along the Eastern Sierra Madre/Cucamonga fault and into the coastal region was simultaneous with a period of high spring tidal forces along the coast. a much later adjustment of this crustal stress change appears to have resulted in a small M3.8 earthquake which was epicentered near Mt. San Gorgonio. The next period of maximum tidal phase angle will be on Sunday, December 12th between 16:17 and 23:51 UTC.

Balboa Pier ( Newport Beach, CA)
2004-12-11 00:43 UTC Sunset
2004-12-11 04:35 UTC 3.79 feet High Tide
2004-12-11 09:21 UTC 1.90 feet Low Tide
2004-12-11 14:46 UTC Sunrise
2004-12-11 15:34 UTC 6.75 feet High Tide
2004-12-11 23:03 UTC -1.47 feet Low Tide
2004-12-11 23:32 UTC MT Shift Detected
2004-12-12 00:43 UTC Sunset
2004-12-12 01:28 UTC New Moon

M3.8 2004/12/12 05:05:52 UT 34.153N 116.980W d:8.5 km ( 7 mi) SSW of Big Bear Lake, CA

2004-12-12 05:27 UTC 3.78 feet High Tide
2004-12-12 10:04 UTC 2.05 feet Low Tide
2004-12-12 14:46 UTC Sunrise
2004-12-12 16:17 UTC 6.89 feet High Tide
2004-12-12 23:51 UTC -1.62 feet Low Tide
2004-12-13 00:44 UTC Sunset


(click here to see spectrogram).





Tremors rock earth deep beneath San Andreas Fault
Puzzling vibrations baffle researchers


MT ULF UPDATE: December 12, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.69 hz (-72.97 dBv) for Northern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. An increase in ULF activity was observed for both the Inland Empire and an area east of Long Valley, CA.

M4.1 2004/12/12 09:13:33 UT 40.697N 123.868W d:27.2 km ( 14 mi) SSE of Blue Lake, CA
M3.0 2004/12/13 03:27:24 UT 32.124N 115.836W d:12.2 km ( 42 mi) SSW of Mexicali, Mexico


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 13, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics. A short duration MT pulse was observed shortly after a micro quake epicentered near Lake Arrowhead, CA. Another high frequency ULF signal burst was associated with the same seismic event. A second ULF signal burst (complex) with both high and low frequency content was detected and associated with a micro quake epicentered along the Mill Creek branch of the Southern San Andreas fault zone just north of the geologically active San Gorgonio Pass.

M3.0 2004/12/13 12:05:41 UT 32.004N 115.785W d:6.9 km ( 41 mi) N of Lázaro Cárdenas, Mexico


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 14, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz.

M3.8 2004/12/15 04:16:52 UT 36.635N 121.253W d:10.8 km (9 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 15, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz.

M3.1 2004/12/15 17:24:42 UT 36.882N 121.619W d:7.6 km ( 1 mi) ESE of Aromas, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 16, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Today, there was an increase in ULF and MT activity which appears to be related to an increase in crustal stress along the Transverse Range in Southern California. Some periods with observed unclamping were also detected.

M3.6 2004/12/16 11:37:51 UT 33.868N 118.734W d:0.0 km ( 11 mi) SSE of Malibu, CA
M3.0 2004/12/16 22:44:47 40.312 -124.544 21.2 22 km ( 14 mi) W of Petrolia, CA

This is the second time so far this month that an area which had a precursor geomagnetic oscillation has also been close to the epicenter of a recent earthquake. Both the Mt. San Gorgonio/Big Bear Lake M3.8 and the Malibu, CA M3.6 had observed strong geomagnetic field oscillations associated with micro quakes last December 3, 2004. The only other local area with oscillation, which so far hasn't had an earthquake related to it is near Fontana, CA.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 17, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Yesterday's reported increase in ULF and MT activity continued over the past 24 hours. There was one incident with strong unclamping, which was associated with a micro quake epicentered along the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault Near Little Rock and Juniper Hills, CA. This was the second time that strong unclamping was observed coming from this segment. The last one was southeast near Valyermo and Pallet Creek, CA. In other news, The seismic activity at Mt. Saint Helens was incrasing and included three small earthquakes. So, you now need to watch the Eastern Sierras for signs of harmonic resonance, much similar to what was observed earlier this year.

M3.1 2004/12/17 17:16:37 UT 46.194N 122.191W d:0.1 km ( 1 mi) SW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA
M3.0 2004/12/17 06:51:00 UT 46.195N 122.187W d:0.0 km ( 0 mi) SW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA
M3.1 2004/12/17 01:24:46 UT 46.196N 122.187W d:0.0 km ( 0 mi) SW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 18, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Increased ULF and MT activity continued during the past 24 hours. There were three detected periods with unclamping. In other news, The robust seismic activity at Mt. Saint Helens volcano included another four small earthquakes.

M3.1 2004/12/19 04:59:47 UT 46.197N 122.194W d:0.7 km ( 1 mi) WSW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA
M3.0 2004/12/19 00:11:57 UT 46.196N 122.187W d:0.4 km ( 0 mi) SW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA
M3.1 2004/12/18 19:07:26 UT 46.196N 122.196W d:0.6 km ( 1 mi) WSW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA
M3.1 2004/12/18 12:41:30 UT 46.196N 122.190W d:0.9 km ( 1 mi) WSW of Mt St. Helens Volcano, WA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 19, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Increased ULF and MT activity continued during the past 24 hours. There was one detected period with unclamping. In other news, The robust seismic activity at Mt. Saint Helens volcano included one small earthquake.

M3.1 2004/12/19 12:47:05 UT 46.193N 122.187W d:1.1 km ( 1 mi) SW of Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 20, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Increased ULF and MT activity continued during the past 24 hours. There were at least three detected periods with infrasonic unclamping, including a long period during the afternoon. Early morning hours had a long period (> 3 hours) of unclamping which appeared to be related to either the Cajon Pass region or Tehachapi, CA and the Garlock fault. The next Full Moon will be on December 26, 2004.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 21, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Elevated ULF and MT activity continued during the past 24 hours. There were a couple of detected periods with infrasonic unclamping. Also, a ULF signal burst was associated with a micro quake which was epicentered near Little Lake, CA. Another short duration MT pulse was detected along with piezomagnetic micro bursts.
The next New Moon will be on January 10, 2005.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 22, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Zone Alert continues to stay in effect. Additionally, there is a renewed Inland Empire Advisory for the region from Upland to the Morongo Valley and from Valyermo/Wrightwood to the Coachella Valley.
There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. HOwever, increasingly elevated ULF and MT activity continued over the past 24 hours. There was a single period with detected infrasonic unclamping which lasted for approximately 12 hours in duration, which began immediately after a micro quake epicentered along Lower Lytle Creek Ridge between the San Jacinto fault zone and the San Andreas fault zone in Devore, CA. Right-Lateral slip is inferred to have increased crustal stress along the Glen Helen fault, which is the eastern strand of the Northern San Jacinto Fault Zone. The geology of the region is extremely complex, and I s uggest that you all review the following file about the geology of the Devore Quadrangle.

The Geology of the Devore Quadrangle

Last July, I observed a major change in infrasonics (Acoustic Emission) which appeared to be associated with a high crustal stress region near Devore, CA (Glen Helen Fault). The anomalous activity was in a region of both thrust and strike-slip faults, and centered in the Cajon Pass.
Recently, I reported observing anomalous ULF and MT changes coming from near both Little Rock/Juniper Hills and Valyermo, CA. I believe that crustal stress is beginning to peak out as the length of time for significant unclamping events (decompression) increases. I recently observed some further unclamping, which was associated with the Rialto-Colton fault north of Fontana, CA. It appears that the right-lateral San Jacinto fault is causing the Eastern Sierra Madre/Cucamonga thrust fault to react to crustal stress changes. In the past six months, I've documented several periods with geomagnetic oscillation which were associated with the Transverse Range. A recent event was located just east of Wrightwood, CA at Lone Pine Canyon (San Andreas). Two events with unclamping, two events with acoustic emission changes, and two with geomagnetic oscillation were also inferred to be associated with the Rialto-Colton fault, and another with the Eastern Sierra-Madre/Cucamonga thrust fault. Another AE change was inferred to be coming from an area east of Ontario, CA (Fontana Seismic Trend). High frequency ULF signal bursts were detected coming from near Lake Arrowhead, Loma Linda/Redlands, Big Bear Lake, Angelus Oaks (Mill Creek Fault) and the Morongo Valley. There were also several other incidents with geomagnetic oscillation that were inferred to be coming from near Loma Linda, Redlands and Yucaipa, CA. Also, several incidents of AE changes that were associated with an alignment from east of Lucerne Valley to south of Joshua Tree, CA. The October 2, 2004 High Frequency ULF burst was located right between two recent earthquakes epicentered north of Big Bear Lake, CA (Helendale Fault). A High Frequency ULF burst was located just south of the recent earthquake epicentered along the Mill Creek fault. I plotted all of the recorded anomalies on a geologic map, and it aligns with the Southern San Andreas fault from west of Wrightwood to the Coachella Valley and north along the ECSZ and west along the Northern Frontal fault zone again towards the Cajon Pass. Based upon these observations, it's inferred that a regional increase in crustal stress now encompasses the San Bernardino segment of the San Andreas Fault zone between The Coachella Valley and the San Bernardino Valley along with the Northen San Jacinto fault zone from Wrightwood to Loma Linda/Redlands, CA.

History:

In recent history, there have been no reported earthquakes equal to or greater than M7.0, epicentered on the San Bernardino Valley segment of the San Jacinto fault zone. However, there were several earthquakes which had significant warning foreshocks (M5.5) and main shocks in the range between M5.6 and M6.5 It's inferred that the San Jacinto fault is capable of having an earthquake with a M7.0 which could have consequences greater than that of a M8 epicentered on the nearby San Andreas fault. The San Jacinto fault is capable of producing a surface slip of 2 meters. Strong seismic events have occured in 1858, 1890, 1894, 1899, 1907, 1918, 1923 and 1970. On September 12, 1970 a M5.4 was epicentered at Lytle Creek. The July 22, 1899 event was epicentered in the Cajon Pass near Lytle Creek, CA. Overall, The San Jacinto fault zone appears to be the most disturbed of all the regional faults in Southern California.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 23, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Elevated ULF and MT activity continued during the past 24 hours. A period with strong geomagnetic oscillation was associated with a micro quake epicentered along the San Andreas fault in Central California. The long duration unclamping event is still in effect. The latest Near Real-Time Data Display web page indicates that a short duration MT pulse has been detected.
The next Full Moon will be on December 26, 2004.
Special Note: I will continue to post the daily reports and update all charts during the holidays.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 24, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Elevated ULF and MT activity continued during the past 24 hours. A second period with strong geomagnetic oscillation was associated with a micro quake epicentered along the San Andreas fault in Central California. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. The regions near Fontana and Yucaipa were inferred to have increased ULF activity.
The next Full Moon will be on December 26, 2004.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 25, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There were no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics below 2 Hz. Elevated ULF and MT activity continued over the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. The strong M9.0 earthquake in Asia may have affected some of the measurements. All charts were updated with the preliminary results, including those from anomalies in the Mono Lake, Coso Volcanic region and the Transverse Range. One other point still in question was if any false triggered quakes made it through the automated system and listed as real events.

M3.9 2004/12/26 03:56:28 UT 37.966N 118.660W d:7.8 km ( 25 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV

San Simeon, California
26 December 2004 - 27 December 2004
35.6417° N, 121.1883° W

2004-12-26  00:08 UTC  -0.65 feet  Low Tide
2004-12-26  00:57 UTC   Sunset
2004-12-26  06:45 UTC   3.49 feet  High Tide
2004-12-26  10:55 UTC   2.44 feet  Low Tide
2004-12-26  15:07 UTC   Full Moon
2004-12-26  15:13 UTC   Sunrise
2004-12-26  17:11 UTC   5.91 feet  High Tide
2004-12-27  00:40 UTC  -0.66 feet  Low Tide
2004-12-27  00:58 UTC   Sunset
2004-12-27  07:20 UTC   3.47 feet  High Tide
2004-12-27  11:26 UTC   2.49 feet  Low Tide
2004-12-27  15:13 UTC   Sunrise
2004-12-27  17:42 UTC   5.85 feet  High Tide
2004-12-28  00:59 UTC   Sunset


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 26, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There was a period with observed strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.74 Hz (-75.45 dBv). Elevated ULF and MT activity continued over the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. There was one MT pulse detected which appears to be associated with a micro quake epicentered near Big Bear Lake, CA. The ULF mean average has finally reversed direction with a significant negative change. As for the great earthquake in Southeast Asia, There is a tendency towards having an earthquake of this magnitude near the end of a solar cycle. It was in 1960 that a M9.5 earthquake epicentered in Chile was considered to be the largest ever recorded in modern history. That was 44 years ago, and a solar cycle is equal to eleven years. So, this earthquake in 1960 matches the point in the solar cycle, plus or minus one year. It was apporximately four years later that a M9.2 earthquake was epicentered in Prince William Sound, Alaska. So, an earthquake of such high magnitude can cause remote triggering even years later. We may now be affected here on the west coast of North America. However, I'm greatly concerned about the Himalayas, which could be the next location in the chain.

M3.8 2004/12/26 21:13:44 39.822 -120.788 5.1 9 km ( 5 mi) SW of Cromberg, CA
M3.4 2004/12/27 00:24:01 39.821 -120.788 5.4 9 km ( 5 mi) SW of Cromberg, CA

The next New Moon will be on January 10, 2005.

San Simeon, California
9 January 2005 - 10 January 2005
35.6417° N, 121.1883° W

2005-01-09  01:08 UTC   Sunset
2005-01-09  05:47 UTC   3.70 feet  High Tide
2005-01-09  10:09 UTC   2.17 feet  Low Tide
2005-01-09  15:14 UTC   Sunrise
2005-01-09  16:28 UTC   6.88 feet  High Tide
2005-01-09  23:55 UTC  -1.81 feet  Low Tide
2005-01-10  01:09 UTC   Sunset
2005-01-10  06:30 UTC   3.87 feet  High Tide
2005-01-10  11:00 UTC   2.04 feet  Low Tide
2005-01-10  12:03 UTC   New Moon
2005-01-10  15:14 UTC   Sunrise
2005-01-10  17:16 UTC   7.03 feet  High Tide
2005-01-11  00:40 UTC  -1.91 feet  Low Tide


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 27, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There were no observed strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics. ULF and MT activity continued to increase over the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. The ULF mean average continued it's reversal. As far as the Asian Earthquake is concerned, there is some indication of stress nucleation towards the Nicobar Islands, India. So, they may be due for another strong aftershock (M7+). This evening, the piezomagnetic activity soared to an extremely high level. Areas with inferred ULF/MT activity included Mt. San Gorgonio, Mettler and San Bernardino, CA. So, that may be something which needs your immediate attention.

M4.3 2004/12/27 10:36:23 UT 38.747N 122.727W d:2.9 km (3 mi) SW of Anderson Springs, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 28, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There was a period with observed strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.28 Hz (-71.39 dBv). ULF and MT activity continued to increase during the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. This evening, the piezomagnetic activity level is extremely high. Areas with inferred ULF/MT activity included Anza, Borrego Springs and Parkfield, CA. The infrasonic unclamping became erratic over the past several hours, with a period a strong harmonic resonance associated with the Mojave Desert Block. The high tides along the coast of Southern and Central California due to the storm may be driving crustal stress higher than what was expected. So, all should now stay on alert at this time.

M3.0 2004/12/28 14:37:40 UT 32.102N 115.880W d:6.0 km ( 45 mi) S of Ocotillo, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 29, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There was a period with observed strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 0.66 Hz (-70.07 dBv). ULF and MT activity was sustained during the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. The piezomagnetic activity level was decreased after a long period with high levels. Areas with inferred ULF/MT activity included Borrego Springs, CA. The infrasonic harmonic resonant frequency associated with the Gulf of California and further north along the plate boundary, was active. There was a period with strong unclamping, which was associated with a micro quake epicentered east of Big Bear Lake and North of Yucca Valley, CA. Another infrasonic uppper level harmonic was observed coming from near Borrego Springs, CA. There was another strong upper level harmonic, which appears to be associated with the Central San Andreas fault.

M3.3 2004/12/30 01:37:44 UT 37.285N 119.378W d:32.9 km ( 8 mi) ENE of North Fork, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 30, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There was a period with observed strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.93 Hz (-75.84 dBv). ULF and MT activity was decreased during the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. The piezomagnetic activity level was decreased after a long period with high levels. Areas with inferred ULF/MT activity included Baja and Borrego Springs, CA. The infrasonic harmonic resonant frequency associated with Northern California and further north along the plate boundary, was active. There was a period with strong unclamping, which was associated with a micro quake epicentered at Wrightwood, CA. Another infrasonic upper level harmonic was observed coming from near Mt. San Gorgonio. There was an extremely low frequency ULF burst also associated with a micro quake epicentered along the So. San Andreas fault where there was also a response to a geomagnetic shift related to a micro quake epicentered at Mount St. Helens, WA.
The next New Moon and resulting Spring Tide will be on January 10, 2005.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: December 31, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert along with Inland Empire advisory continues to stay in effect. There was a period with observed strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.81 Hz (-77.47 dBv). ULF and MT activity was decreased during the past 24 hours. The long duration unclamping event is still in progress. The infrasonic harmonic resonant frequency associated with Northern California and further north along the plate boundary, was active. There was a period with a resonant harmonic, which was associated with a micro quake epicentered near Mexicali and along the Imperial fault. Also, there were periods of infrasonic activity associated with micro quake epicentered near the Fontana, CA region.


(click here to see spectrogram).





2005 CALENDAR
The last Full Moon was on December 26, 2004. The next New Moon and resulting Spring Tides will be on January 10, 2005.


Special Statement:
It's the time of year when I begin the official winter fund drive to help keep the lab operating throughout the new year. One item that needs some emphasis is the annual operating costs related to being registered as a public corporation within the state of California; a fee that is fixed at 800 Dollars annually for the privalege of being an entity. This year, I paid nearly 2 Thousand Dollars in fees to keep the lab legally registered and debt free. To all those people who helped out last year, it was certainly appreciated and kept the operations viable throughout fiscal year 2004. So you're all now being encouraged to participate again.

A year ago, I essentially worked right on through the holidays after the Mw6.5 San Simeon Earthquake. You can be assured that I've already planned on doing the same this year, too.

Seasons Greetings to all, and Have a Safe and Happy New Year, too!



MT ULF Charts and Experimental Forecast

The Latest Near Real-Time Data from GeoSeismic Labs

The Southern California Seismic Alert

The most recent MT peak reading (31-DEC-2004) was measured at 8.7 units of regional lithospheric stress.



Graphic: Chart for Regional Lithospheric Stress Level

Graphic: Chart for Acoustic Emissions

Graphic: Chart for ULF STD DEV

Graphic: Recent ULF Report

Graphic: Recent Anomalies Report

Graphic: Daily Geomagnetic Field Report

Graphic: Chart for ULF Mean Average

Frank Condon,
December 31, 2004

This information is provided as a public service by GeoSeismic Labs of California, a State Registered "Not for Profit" Corporation Since 2001.


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