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Precursor
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©GeoSeismic Labs 2004.


Volume 4, Issue No. 335

Graphic: Map of West Coast Volcanoes
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GeoSeismic Labs Reports: Early Edition

All information reported here is based upon data collection and analysis using procedures that are considered "experimental" and might be of a shocking nature to some individuals. Read and use at your own risk!

SAN JACINTO FAULT ALERT: Wrightwood to Anza, CA





Mount St. Helens Eruption Update:

U.S. Geological Survey, Vancouver, Washington
University of Washington, Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network, Seattle, Washington

Mount St. Helens Volcano, November 29, 2004 9:30 am PST (1730 UTC)

Current status is Volcano Advisory (Alert Level 2); aviation color code ORANGE


The Latest Eruption Update for the Unrest at Mt. Saint Helens, WA

Definition of Alert Levels

Mount St. Helens Satellite Imagery

For additional information, background, images, and other graphics, please visit:

Pacific Northwest Seismic Network

Caution: You may need to refresh the displayed page in order to view the latest live Volcano-Webcam.

Graphic: Mt. Saint Helens Webcam
Graphic: Popocatepetl Volcano  Webcam


Links to Phenomena Associated with Earthquakes Worldwide

Earthquake Lights: Kobe Earthquake in Japan 1995

Recent Infrasonics Associated with Deep
Crustal Resonant Frequency Activity along
the Pacific and North American Plate Boundary

Graphic:(AE)Infrasonic Spectrogram
Pacific Northwest CRF


Eastern California Shear Zone
CA/NV Border/Eastern Sierras/Yellowstone
Tectonic and Volcanic Activity

How Volcanoes Work

Yellowstone Swarm Report: 2004

Volcanoes of Canada

Living With a Restless Caldera:Long Valley, California

Adobe Hills Volcanic Field

Summary of Holocene eruptive activity and probable greatest hazards from future eruptions at volcanic centers in California

Eruptions from the Inyo chain about 600 Years ago: sequence of events and effects in the Long Valley Area

Long Valley Tilt Meters

ERS radar interferometry reveals strain transient in the Eastern California Shear Zone

USGS California Tiled 2 Degree Maps

USGS California Quarternary Fault and Fold Database Maps

Graphic: Map of Nevada Volcanoes Graphic: Map of Volcanic Hazard Zones for California

San Jacinto Fault Zone Advisory
GeoSeismic Labs of California
Hesperia, California




(Click here to view MT ULF REPORTS published last month).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 1, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.65 Hz (-67.00 dBv) for Baja California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. Also, there were several periods with strong geomagnetic oscillation which was associated with the Southern San Andreas fault zone at San Gorgonio Pass begining shortly after the small earthquake epicentered near the Amboy Volcanic field. that came on the heels of my report yesterday about anomalies related to the Mission Creek branch of the Southern San Andreas Fault Zone near the Morongo Valley and indicating a high crustal stress region in between the ECSZ and the plate boundary along the San Andreas fault zone
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 2, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.95 Hz (-68.32 dBv) for the Salton Sea region and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. Also, the strong geomagnetic oscillations continued for the Southern San Andreas fault zone and intensified during the past 24 hours. Micro quakes epicentered near the Amboy Crater were very active and indicate that the ECSZ is at an extremely high stress level from Ridgecrest to Indio, CA. However, the main focus of my analysis is along the Southern San Andreas fault zone from the Cajon Pass to Indio, CA then north to the Garlock fault and east to the Ludlow fault. When there is such a high level of deep crustal stress you can expect to see many smaller secondary faults begin to show signs of activity. Currently an area east of Ludlow is indicating that faults in the region are reacting to the dangerously high crustal stress in the region of the ECSZ/Mojave Desert block.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 3, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.71 Hz (-67.09 dBv) for the Gulf of California region and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. Also, the strong geomagnetic oscillations continued for the Southern San Andreas fault zone.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 4, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.93 Hz (-68.04 dBv) for the Salton Sea region and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. The strong geomagnetic oscillations seem to have decreased to near background levels.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 5, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.60 Hz (-70.48 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. The CRF (Crustal Resonant Frequency) has abruptly shifted towards the north and appears to be related to a transfer of stress into the Cascades region. A similar shift was observad on October 2, 2004.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 6, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.67 Hz (-73.39 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. Infrasonics at the upper level spectral region included the Central California Sierra Nevada Mountains NE of Fresno, CA and the Cucamonga fault near Upland, CA.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 7, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.61 Hz (-71.83 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary including the Pacific Northwest Cascades. A significant increase in seismic activity occurred after the arrival of a CME induced shockwave that was registered at 18:31 UTC, less than an hour prior to a M3.2 earthquake epicentered near the summit of the Mt. Rainier volcano at 19:23 UTC. Also, activity associated with a geothermal center at the Salton Sea along the Plate boundary increased during the same time period. The geomagnetic field at last check (03:00 UTC) was negative and indicating that a major to severe geomagnetic storm was still in progress.

A.  Energetic Events
Begin  Max  End  Rgn   Loc   Xray  Op 245MHz 10cm   Sweep
 0138 0145 0151  0696 N10W06 C3.2  Sf 120    72                     
 0254 0254 0254                       490                           
 1542 1606 1615  0696        X2.0     42000  4600   II/IV           
 1658 1659 1732                       430    180                    
 2323 2326 2328  0696        C1.6     2300        
 

At best, this is only going to add to the high levels of crustal stress along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary currently being disturbed by the arrival of the CME(solar shockwave) at 18:31 UTC.

M1.6 2004/11/07 21:28:16 UTC 33.175N 115.620W d:4.5 km ( 1 mi) ENE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.4 2004/11/07 21:10:17 UTC 33.202N 115.612W d:4.7 km ( 3 mi) NNE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M2.0 2004/11/07 20:45:31 UTC 33.163N 115.613W d:5.3 km ( 1 mi) ESE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M2.0 2004/11/07 20:44:18 UTC 33.181N 115.617W d:1.7 km ( 1 mi) ENE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.6 2004/11/07 20:43:02 UTC 33.181N 115.612W d:4.4 km ( 2 mi) ENE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.6 2004/11/07 19:47:11 UTC 33.171N 115.621W d:3.3 km ( 1 mi) E of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.7 2004/11/07 19:46:54 UTC 33.246N 115.615W d:3.1 km ( 5 mi) NNE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.9 2004/11/07 19:25:17 UTC 33.173N 115.630W d:3.0 km ( 0 mi) ENE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.4 2004/11/07 19:24:35 UTC 33.168N 115.619W d:3.1 km ( 1 mi) E of Obsidian Butte, CA

M3.2 2004/11/07 19:23:59 UTC 46.843N 121.756W d:1.6 km ( 14 mi) ENE of Ashford, WA


MT ULF UPDATE: November 8, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.09 Hz (-68.50 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. A small earthquake was epicentered near Barstow, CA and appears to be associated with the current measured level of harmonics associated with high crustal stress within Southern California and the Mojave Desert block. The earthquake was also epicentered between key fault segments(Calico and Blackwater) that act as conveyors of ECSZ stress nucleating towards the Garlock fault and the Ridgecrest to Olancha Peak region of the Owens Valley and Southern Sierras, including the Coso Volcanic center and Lake Isabella. The geomagnetic field at last check (08:00 UTC) was still negative and indicating that some recovery was in progress from yesterday's Solar shockwave that created a major to severe geomagnetic disturbance in the local field (Kp index reading = 8). The ULF Mean Average continues to be quite anomalous over the past several days.

M3.7 2004/11/09 06:44:04 UT 35.035N 116.909W d:4.3 km ( 13 mi) NNE of Barstow, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 9, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.08 Hz (-68.92 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. There was a micro quake epicentered near Big Bend, CA that has a high frequency ULF signal burst associated with it. The geomagnetic field at last check (08:00 UTC) was still indicating that a severe geomagnetic storm was in progress from two Solar shockwaves that created a major to severe geomagnetic disturbance in the local field (Kp index reading = 7). The ULF Mean Average continues to be increasingly positive with time.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 10, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.07 Hz (-68.37 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. check (08:00 UTC) was in recovery from a severe geomagnetic storm that created a major to severe geomagnetic disturbance in the local field (Kp index reading = 8). The ULF Mean Average continues to be increasingly positive with time.

A.  Energetic Events
Begin  Max  End  Rgn   Loc   Xray  Op 245MHz 10cm   Sweep
 0000 0000 0247                                        IV           
 0159 0213 0220  0696 N09W49 X2.5  3b 2700   650    II/IV           
 0221 0221 0249       N09W48       3n                               
 0234 0000 0241                                     II              
 0247 0000 0410                                        IV           
 0305 0305 0306                       480                           
 0441 0441 0441                       87               IV           
 0600 0000 0800                                        IV           
 0727 0739 0747              C2.6     110                           
 0749 0749 0750                       440                           
 0839 0839 0839                       520                           
 0956 0956 0956                       250                           
 2205 2205 2205                       67               IV          
 

At best, this recent flare up solar activity is only going to add to the high levels of crustal stress along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary and within the Mojave desert block.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 11, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.72 Hz (-71.41 dBv) for Northern California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. Due to techinical difficulties the ULF charts were not updated today.

M3.7 2004/11/11 10:50:48 UT 34.723N 116.050W d:2.2 km ( 6 mi) E of Ludlow, CA

M1.0 2004/11/11 07:10:01 33.211N 115.550W 6.1 5 km ( 3 mi) SW of Niland, CA
M1.7 2004/11/11 07:00:00 33.173N 115.643W 0.9 1 km ( 0 mi) WNW of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.7 2004/11/11 06:59:33 33.171N 115.647W 0.0 1 km ( 1 mi) W of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.2 2004/11/11 06:59:29 33.155N 115.668W 0.0 3 km ( 2 mi) WSW of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.7 2004/11/11 01:32:46 33.187N 115.605W 2.2 3 km ( 2 mi) ENE of Obsidian Butte, CA
M1.2 2004/11/11 01:19:25 33.187N 115.609W 1.6 3 km ( 2 mi) NE of Obsidian Butte, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 12, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.15 Hz (-69.08 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary.

M1.7 2004/11/12 10:27:22 34.721N 116.051W 3.5 10 km ( 6 mi) E of Ludlow, CA
M2.9 2004/11/12 10:04:59 34.724N 116.055W 2.4 10 km ( 6 mi) E of Ludlow, CA
M1.6 2004/11/12 09:28:20 34.727N 116.056W 3.2 10 km ( 6 mi) E of Ludlow, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 13, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.53 Hz (-70.97 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary.

M1.7 2004/11/13 18:51:56 34.357N 116.848W 9.5 11 km ( 7 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA
M2.0 2004/11/13 18:16:35 34.354N 116.849W 9.2 10 km ( 6 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA
M1.7 2004/11/13 17:54:07 34.358N 116.843W 8.6 11 km ( 7 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA
M1.3 2004/11/13 17:53:28 34.356N 116.861W 11.1 10 km ( 7 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA

M4.2 2004/11/13 17:39:16 34.353N 116.845W 9.6 10 km ( 6 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA

M1.5 2004/11/13 15:43:55 34.096N 116.868W 8.4 4 km ( 2 mi) W of Mt. San Gorgonio, CA
M1.8 2004/11/13 06:27:03 34.354N 116.841W 8.6 10 km ( 6 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA

Last October 2, 2004 I detected a high frequency ULF signal burst which was located in between both of the two most recent earthquakes (M3.8/M4.2) epicentered along the Helendale fault and north of Big Bear Lake, CA. This may indicate that the Northern Frontal fault from the Cajon Pass to Yucca Valley is now in preparation along with the Southern San Andreas fault zone. The ULF mean average is now at the same level it was at last March. Whatever caused the changes observed in early July is still driving the high levels of stress now in place along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary in Southern California. The San Simeon and Parkfield earthquakes were the actual wake-up call. I've detected higher frequency ULF pulsations coming from an area north of Big Bear Lake and east of Lake Arrowhead.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 14, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.48 Hz (-70.53 dBv) for Southern and Central California and north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. The ULF mean average continued to increase in the positive direction over the past 24 hours.

M3.0 2004/11/14 15:33:45 34.187N 117.435W 3.3 5 km ( 3 mi) SW of Devore, CA

Beginning on approximately July 10, 2004, I detected a significant change in acoustic emissions(AE) and the amplitude of all resonant harmonics being detected along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary at a region from Wrightwood to San Gorgonio Pass. This is attributed to a significant increase in pore-pressure as high pressure fluids began to further weaken the San Andreas fault by reducing normal stress. In its aftermath, unclamping became nearly constant according to what was detected by the mass resonant sensor being used here in the high desert lab located 12 miles NE of the Cajon Pass/San Andreas Fault.
Here is what was typically detected for a small earthquake prior to July, 2004:

2004/03/19 01:09:22 34.309N 116.931W 9.6 3.6 8 km (5 mi) NNW of town of Big Bear Lake, CA
2004/05/09 08:57:17 34.403N 120.027W 3.8 4.6 15 km ( 10 mi) W of Isla Vista, CA
2004/06/01 14:36:14 34.295N 116.878W 5.5 3.1 5 km (3 mi) NW of Big Bear City, CA
2004/06/29 10:20:43 36.072N 117.901W 5.5 3.7 5 km ( 3 mi) NE of Coso Junction, CA

On July 10, 2004: Important Detected Change in Local Acoustic Emissions (AE)

2004/07/14 00:53:52 33.711N 116.056W 12.8 4.0 12 km ( 7 mi) ENE of Coachella, CA
2004/07/28 20:19:42 34.129N 117.448W 6.3 3.8 4 km ( 2 mi) NNE of Fontana, CA
2004/08/30 20:51:36 34.424N 117.683W 6.3 3.2 9 km ( 6 mi) NNW of Wrightwood, CA
2004/11/13 17:39:16 34.353N 116.845W 9.6 4.2 10 km ( 6 mi) N of Big Bear City, CA
2004/11/14 15:33:45 34.187N 117.435W 3.3 3.0 5 km ( 3 mi) SW of Devore, CA

You may ask, Why the alert for the San Jacinto fault? It's because the increased unclamping (decompression) now being inferred at the Cajon Pass and the San Andreas fault may indicate that significant slip is being transfered to the San Jacinto fault zone. The northern segment is associated with a 40 km seismic gap from the Cajon Pass to Riverside, and a 40 km region near Anza and southeast to Coyote Mountain is known as the Anza Seismic Gap. This fault has the highest level of seismicity of any other faults associated with the San Andreas fault system indicating that transfered strain is high. It's also considered a young fault, and highly un-predictable. The number of earthquakes include six large seismic events within the past 75 years. The overall recurrence interval is an average 10 years. It has has now been over 35 years since the last large earthquake epicentered on the San Jacinto fault(1968).

Domino Earthquakes



"Whatever caused the changes observed in early July are still driving the high levels of stress now in place along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary in Southern California. The San Simeon and Parkfield earthquakes were the actual wake-up calls."


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 15, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.58 Hz (-70.86 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. The latest observation regarding infrasonic harmonics and changes associated with crustal stress along the plate boundary include the detection of further decompression in a region east of Morongo valley and south of Joshua Tree, CA.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 16, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.52 Hz (-70.82 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. The latest observation regarding infrasonic harmonics and changes associated with crustal stress along the plate boundary include the detection of further decompression in a region near the Western Garlock Fault south of Tehachapi, CA, the Elsinore and Eastern Sierra Madre/Cucamonga Faults in the Inland Empire.

M3.2 2004/11/16 09:34:05 UT 35.784N 120.329W d:9.3 km ( 9 mi) NNE of Shandon, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 17, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There were no detected periods with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy for Central California and futher north along the plate boundary.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 18, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.98 HZ (-73.55 dBv).

M3.9 2004/11/19 02:56:00 UT 35.862N 120.408W d:9.5 km ( 3 mi) SSE of Parkfield, CA

I'm currently analyzing the infrasonic data collected for the recent M4.2 Big Bear Lake earthquake. A preliminary analysis shows that the ECSZ source of the highest level of crustal stress in region is located along the Pisgah-Bullion fault, which ruptured during the Hector Mine earthquake in 1999.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 19, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There were no detected periods with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy.

M3.4 2004/11/19 13:44:18 UT 35.645N 121.083W d:4.0 km ( 6 mi) E of San Simeon, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 20, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There were no detected periods with locally strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy. One significant high frequency ULF signal burst was associated with the continuous activity near Parkfield, CA in Central California. The ULF mean average was unchanged.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 21, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.48 hz (-73.34 dBv) for Central California. The ULF mean average was less negative.

M3.0 2004/11/22 05:39:06 UT 33.861N 117.769W d:6.7 km ( 2 mi) SE of Yorba Linda, CA

The small earthquake epicentered SE of Yorba Linda, CA was also located near where on November 16, 2004 I detected unclamping (decompression) along the Elsinore fault zone. Today, I detected strong crustal energy (infrasonic) associated with the Fontana and Morongo Valley regions, and from near the CA/NV border, east of Mono Lake.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 22, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 0.67 hz (-67.13 dBv) for the Gulf of California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. The ULF mean average was significantly less negative than yesterday's observations and achieved a new high record for the current year.

M3.4 2004/11/22 14:10:41 35.943 -120.492 10.0 7 km ( 4 mi) NW of Parkfield, CA

The small earthquake epicentered NW of Parkfield, CA appears to be related to a previously reported (11/20/2004) high frequency ULF burst. I detected unclamping (decompression) associated with an area NW of Parkfield, north of Los Angeles and east of Bakerfield, CA. Some further periods with high frequency ULF activity and one period with geomagnetic oscillation located near Parkfield, CA.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 23, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.36 hz (-70.88 dBv) for the Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. The ULF mean average was little changed after yesterday's observations, which achieved a new high record for the year.

M3.0 2004/11/23 23:57:51 36.606 -121.209 6.5 10 km ( 6 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA
M3.0 2004/11/24 02:04:46 36.607 -121.211 6.3 10 km ( 6 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA
M4.4 2004/11/24 02:06:04 36.607 -121.209 7.5 10 km ( 6 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA
M3.3 2004/11/24 02:10:58 36.600 -121.200 6.4 9 km ( 6 mi) NNW of Pinnacles, CA
M3.0 2004/11/24 05:12:16 35.779 -120.329 8.8 14 km ( 9 mi) NNE of Shandon, CA
M3.7 2004/11/24 05:23:39 36.600 -121.201 7.3 9 km ( 6 mi) NW of Pinnacles, CA
M3.2 2004/11/24 07:14:30 38.816 -122.816 3.0 2 km ( 1 mi) NNW of The Geysers, CA

Apparently high crustal stress nucleating along the Central San Andreas fault zone triggered off a notable seismic swarm (M4.4) to the northwest at Pinnacles. Also, another small earthquake appeared(M3.0) that was southerly of the usual aftershock zone for last September's long anticipated Parkfield, CA M6.0 that was epicentered close to the northern edge of the Carrizo segment, which last ruptured in 1857.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 24, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 0.81 hz (-68.13 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 25, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.01 hz (-68.08 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. There was one short period with detected geomagnetic oscillation associated with the San Jacinto fault zone near Anza, CA.
(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 26, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 0.91 hz (-68.07 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. There were several short periods with detected piezomagnetic activity associated with the San Jacinto fault, and from near Parkfield and Qualeys Camp, NV.

M3.6 2004/11/26 15:00:00 31.700 -116.034 0.2 43 km ( 26 mi) NW of Lázaro Cárdenas, Mexico
M3.4 2004/11/27 02:08:18 35.708 -121.045 5.2 15 km ( 9 mi) ENE of San Simeon, CA
M3.2 2004/11/27 05:19:40 35.939 -120.485 10.4 6 km ( 4 mi) NW of Parkfield, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 27, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 0.83 hz (-67.15 dBv) for No. Baja, Southern California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. There were several more short periods with detected piezomagnetic activity related to micro quakes epicentered in the Northern Mojave Desert block near Goldstone, and from the Coso Volcanic Field near Sugarloaf Mtn. Late this evening, a small earthquake was epicentered near the California/Nevada border east of the Long Valley caldera that appears to be involved in the high levels of both MT and ULF activity detected over the past 48 hours coming from the ECSZ. Three high frequency ULF signal bursts were also detected that appear to be related to the same build-up in stress located near the Blackwater and Garlock faults. The MT peak reading was at its highest point since last April.

M3.5 2004/11/28 05:02:39 UT 38.028N 118.572W d:0.0 km ( 20 mi) S of Qualeys Camp, NV

In other news, a small earthquake (M3.1) was epicentered at Mt. Saint Helens, WA (volcano) and was the largest since the new lava dome began growing last October. As yet unconfirmed was a possible small eruption in the crater.

M3.1 2004/11/27 13:01:22 UT 46.198N 122.185W d:0.2 km ( 0 mi) WSW of Mt. Saint Helens Volcano, WA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 28, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.57 hz (-71.57 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. There were two short duration MT pulses that appeared to be related to a surge in deep crustal stress nucleating out of the Mojave Desert block and into Central California (San Andreas fault zone) from the Garlock fault and via the Owens Valley into the Eastern Sierras/ California Nevada border region (Adobe Hills Volcanic field). The MT peak reading was at its highest point since last April. The ULF Mean Average reading was at its high point this year. Crustal resonant harmonic energy related to the Mt. Saint Helens Volcano located in the Cascades (PNW) appears to be causing quite a bit of stress in basically the same regions which were affected in late September through October.

M4.2 2004/11/29 01:54:14 35.944 -120.492 10.4 7 km ( 5 mi) NW of Parkfield, CA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 29, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy at 1.27 hz (-70.96 dBv) for Central California and further north along the Pacific and North American Plate boundary. There were three periods with detected geomagnetic oscillation that appeared to related to the volcanic unrest at Mount St. Helens and with a seismic event near the Long Valley caldera.

M2.6 2004/11/29 12:52:39 UT 46.200N 122.186W d:0.0 km ( 0 mi) W of Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA
M2.7 2004/11/29 15:14:53 UT 46.201N 122.195W d:0.0 km ( 1 mi) W of Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF UPDATE: November 30, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to stay in effect. There no detected strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonics There were two periods with detected geomagnetic oscillation that appeared to related to the MT San Gorgonio region.


(click here to see spectrogram).





MT ULF Charts and Experimental Forecast

The Latest Near Real-Time Data from GeoSeismic Labs



The most recent MT peak reading was at 9.2 units of regional lithospheric stress.



Graphic: Chart for Regional Lithospheric Stress Level

Graphic: Chart for Acoustic Emissions

Graphic: Chart for ULF STD DEV

Graphic: Recent ULF Report

Graphic: Daily Geomagnetic Field Report

Graphic: Chart for ULF Mean Average

Frank Condon,
November 30, 2004

This information is provided as a public service by GeoSeismic Labs of California, a State Registered "Not for Profit" Corporation Since 2001.


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