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©GeoSeismic Labs 2004.


Volume 4, Issue No. 305

Graphic: Map of West Coast Volcanoes

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GeoSeismic Labs Reports: Early Edition

All information reported here is based upon data collection and analysis using procedures that are considered "experimental" and might be of a shocking nature to some individuals. Read and use at your own risk!

SAN JACINTO FAULT ALERT: Wrightwood to Anza, CA





Mount St. Helens Eruption Update:

U.S. Geological Survey, Vancouver, Washington
University of Washington, Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network, Seattle, Washington

Mount St. Helens Volcano, October 31, 2004 11:00 am PDT (17:00 UTC)

Current status is Volcano Advisory (Alert Level 2); aviation color code ORANGE


Growth of the new lava dome inside the crater of Mount St. Helens continues. As long as this eruption is in progress, episodic changes in the level of activity can occur over days, weeks, or even months. Increase in the intensity of eruption could occur suddenly or with very little warning and may include explosive events that produce hazardous conditions within several miles of the volcano. Small lahars (volcanic debris flows) could suddenly descend the Toutle River valley if triggered by heavy rain or by interaction of hot rocks with snow or glacier ice. These lahars pose a negligible hazard below the Sediment Retention Structure (SRS), but could pose a hazard to people along the river channel upstream of the SRS. At this time of year, it is not unusual for rivers draining the volcano to contain high concentrations of sediment that turn the water murky.

Although considered less likely at this time, the current eruptive activity could evolve into a more explosive phase that affects areas farther from the volcano and sends significant ash thousands of feet above the crater where it could be a hazard to aircraft and to downwind communities.

Wind forecasts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), coupled with eruption models, show that ash clouds that rise above the crater rim today would drift southeastward from the volcano.

Seismicity remains at a low level compared to that observed early in this unrest. The current seismicity is consistent with a continuing, slow rise of magma driving uplift of the crater floor and feeding a surface extrusion of lava. The overall low rates of seismicity and gas emission suggest that the lava reaching the surface is gas poor, thereby reducing the probability of highly explosive eruptions in the near term.

Crews did not go the field yesterday because of inclement weather. No field work is planned for today.

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Washington continue to monitor the situation closely and will issue additional updates and changes in alert level as warranted.

Telephone recordings with the latest update on Mount St. Helens and phone contacts for additional information can be heard by calling:

Media (360) 891-5180
General public (360) 891-5202

The Latest Eruption Update for the Unrest at Mt. Saint Helens, WA

Definition of Alert Levels

For additional information, background, images, and other graphics, please visit:

Pacific Northwest Seismic Network

Caution: You may need to refresh the displayed page in order to view the latest live Volcano-Webcam.

Graphic: Mt. Saint Helens Webcam



Graphic: Popocatepetl Volcano  Webcam



Recent Infrasonic Activity Associated with Deep Crustal Activity
along the Pacific and North American Plate Boundary

Graphic:(AE)Infrasonic Spectrogram

Eastern California Shear Zone
CA/NV Border/Eastern Sierras
Tectonic and Volcanic Activity

Living With a Restless Caldera:Long Valley, California

Adobe Hills Volcanic Field

Summary of Holocene eruptive activity and probable greatest hazards from future eruptions at volcanic centers in California

Eruptions from the Inyo chain about 600 Years ago: sequence of events and effects in the Long Valley Area

Long Valley Tilt Meters

ERS radar interferometry reveals strain transient in the Eastern California Shear Zone

USGS California Tiled 2 Degree Maps

USGS California Quarternary Fault and Fold Database Maps

Graphic: Map of Nevada Volcanoes Graphic: Map of Volcanic Hazard Zones for California

San Jacinto Fault Zone Advisory
GeoSeismic Labs of California
Hesperia, California



MT ULF UPDATE: October 5, 2004

Today, I noticed increased periods of geomagnetic oscillation associated
with micro quakes mainly epicentered from Wrightwood to Lake Hemet, CA.
Also, some was apparently associated with the Helendale fault and an area
near Tecate, Mexico.

But, my main concern is with the immediate region of the Cajon Pass in
an area specifically aligned along both the San Andreas and San Jacinto fault
zones within the Inland Empire of Southern California near Redlands.
This is a high stress zone and needs to be watched very carefully now that it
has reached a critical point.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 6, 2004

I'm stilll detecting periods with unstable geomagnetic oscillation
that appear to be associated with micro quakes epicentered from near
Redlands to Anza, CA. along the San Jacinto fault Zone(Anza Seismic Gap).
Also, noticed there was a concentration of them ESE of Anza, CA near
Collins Valley. Another high stress point is between Hemet and Banning, CA.
Significant amounts of geomagnetic oscillation often indicate that rupture
is extremely close in time.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 7, 2004

The Infrasonic (AE) Activity has increased over the past 24 hours with definitely
strong spectral content from 1.2 to 1.9 Hz with a peak reading at 1.21 Hz
(-69.01 dBv)and lesser peaks at 1.4 Hz (-72.36 dBv), 1.66 Hz (-72.98 dBv)
and 1.83 Hz (-73.12 dBv). It's inferred that the resonant frequency at 1.21 Hz
is the latitude of Southern Sierras/Coso/Olancha Peak, Parkfield, CA).
Also, the 1.4 Hz is close to being for the latitude of the
Long Valley/Mammoth lakes/Round Valley, CA region. The peak at 1.66 Hz is
infered to be the latitude of Mt. Saint Helens, WA and 1.83 Hz the latitude
of the northern Cascades Mt. Baker region.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 8, 2004

A few earthquakes to note since the last update. There was one near Coso
(M3.2), and one near Parkfield, CA (M3.0) Also, the swarm near Long
Valley/Mammoth Lakes was active with a M4.5 earthquake epicentered in the
Adobe Hills volcanic field. Both regions were noted to have higher than
normal infrasonic (peaks). Also, the seismicity of Mt. Saint Helens also
increased today. The level of geomagnetic oscillation was high, and
I continue to monitor the levels of geomagnetic disturbance. Also, there was one MT pulse which was associated with the Qualeys Camp region that
occurred late in the afternoon. There is an inferred increase in crustal stress
out of the ECSZ/Mojave Desert, which apparently is nucleating towards the
Owens Valley/Southern Sierras and Coso Range. This in turn partially gets
transfered towards the Central California coast and the San Andreas fault via
the Garlock/Big Pine fault zone. The increase in stress along the San Andreas
and Garlock fault then nucleates southeast into the San Jacinto Fault near
Wrightwood, CA. So, the center of highest stress still appears to be the
ECSZ/Mojave Desert block, and that will cause many secondary faults
surrounding the region to react in preparation for the next major earthquake
in Southern California. However, the intensity of geomagnetic oscillation is
telling us that it won't be too much longer.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 9, 2004

The most notable earthquake of the past 24 hours was epicentered in
between both the Western Garlock fault zone(69a) and Cholame(1g) to Mojave segment(1h) along the San Andreas fault zone

M4.7 2004/10/09 03:45:48 UT 37.980 -118.659 8.2 38 km ( 24 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.2 2004/10/09 06:39:09 UT 36.044 -117.807 2.2 13 km ( 8 mi) E of Coso Junction, CA
M3.1 2004/10/09 12:02:43 UT 34.838 -118.343 3.5 13 km ( 8 mi) WSW of Rosamond, CA

This area was recently inferred to be within a high crustal stress
zone in the Mojave Desert block, and associated with the high levels
of geomagnetic oscillation (disturbance) now being detected.
Also, inferred are micro-fractures occuring along the Pacific and North
American Plate boundary, which are visible as discrete jumps in the local
(Cajon Pass) geomagnetic field strength.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 10, 2004

Another earthquake was epicentered north of the Garlock fault
zone and epicentered along the Sierra Nevada Frontal fault zone NW of
Coso Junction, CA.

M3.5 2004/10/10 14:03:22 UT 37.963N 118.661W d:5.3 km ( 25 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.0 2004/10/10 18:58:25 UT 36.080N 117.996W d:3.4 km ( 4 mi) NW of Coso Junction, CA
M3.0 2004/10/10 23:20:44 UT 37.964N 118.659W d:8.2 km ( 25 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.0 2004/10/10 23:39:46 UT 35.591N 120.725W d:5.6 km ( 3 mi) NNW of Templeton, CA

This appears to be an indication of high crustal stress now nucleating
out of the ECSZ/Mojave Desert block and across the Garlock fault zone
into the Sierra Nevada block near Olancha Peak. Remarkably,
there was significantly less geomagnetic oscillation detected
over the past 24 hours.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 11, 2004

Periods of observed unclamping were quite evident during the past 24 hours.
Also, a micro quake epicentered in the Santa Barbara Channel was related
to a geomagnetic shift. No further periods of strong geomagnetic oscillation
were detected, and a micro quake epicentered near Lytle Creek (SJFZ),
that had a ULF burst associated with it.

Infrasonic activity appeared to become quite strong early Monday
evening with a peak at 1.33 Hz (Owens Valley region).



MT ULF UPDATE: October 12, 2004

There were some periods of geomagnetic oscillation detected during the
past 24 hours.

M3.0 2004/10/12 19:51:21 UT 37.977N 118.662W d:9.0 km ( 24 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV

Further unclamping was observed, and inferred to be associated with the
plate boundary at the Cajon Pass region. Some maintenance is scheduled
during the next 24 hours, and the next report could be delayed up to
several hours.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 13, 2004

I'm becoming quite concerned by the number of micro quakes epicentered
along the San Jacinto fault zone and adjacent secondary faults, which
appear to be associated with periods of geomagnetic oscillation and
shifting. The shifting appears to indicate a regime that is under high
crustal stress. So, those of you within local distance of the San
Jacinto fault zone at the Cajon Pass should stay on alert and keep
an eye on those pets, too.

M3.3 2004/10/13 08:34:16 UT 38.063N 118.695W d:4.0 km ( 19 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.4 2004/10/13 21:46:39 UT 35.799N 120.343W d:11.1 km ( 9 mi) SE of Parkfield, CA

Possibly this will spread out even further to other adjacent faults as
it nears in time.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 14, 2004

The latest analysis of Geomagnetic shifting indicates increased association
with faults local to the Inland Empire. Namely the Rialto-Colton fault appears
to have had at least two periods of shifting related to micro quakes during the
past 24 hours. Grand Terrace may now be close to the focus of the shifting.
Also, local geomagnetic field oscillation was quite active. So, the San
Jacinto fault needs to be watched carefully.

M4.1 2004/10/14 01:04:21 UT 27.689N 112.015W d:10.0 km ( 30 mi) NNE of Santa Rosalía, Mexico





MT ULF UPDATE: October 15, 2004

There were several periods of observed geomagnetic oscillation that appear to be related to the Plate boundary in Southern California. Another interesting detection was shifting associated with one of the faults south of Joshua Tree, which failed during the Landers earthquake in 1992. Also one period of unclamping was observed. One comment about the small earthquake in Santa Paula, which appears to be associated with the San Cayetano fault. We can expect to see more random seismic activity along the secondary faults as the plate boundary moves closer to failure.

M3.4 2004/10/16 05:05:35 UT 34.454N 119.116W d:26.4 km ( 7 mi) NNW of Santa Paula, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 16, 2004

There were several hours of time where strong unclamping was observed. Also, another geomagnetic field shift associated with a micro quake epicentered near Cherry Valley, CA. Some geomagnetic oscillation was also observed coming from east of the San Andreas fault and Indio, CA. The strongest infrasonic harmonic was at 1.09 Hz, which is just above the inferred resonant frequency (1 Hz) for the Plate boundary in Southern California.

M3.1 2004/10/17 05:57:02 UT 35.898N 120.442W d:6.4 km ( 1 mi) WSW of Parkfield, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 17, 2004

Once again, there were several hours where strong unclamping was observed. Infrasonic Harmonic activity was moderate. No geomagnetic oscillation was detected. There were a couple micro quakes which was epicentered SE of the aftershock zone for the Parkfield M6.0 in the Cholame Valley that had observed ULF activity. It's an area where according to some experts the precursor for the next great earthquake(1857) is inferred to be located.

M3.2 2004/10/17 11:35:11 UT 35.579N 120.882W d:5.9 km ( 10 mi) N of Cayucos, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 18, 2004

Continued strong unclamping was observed during the past 24 hours. Also, infrasonic harmonic activity for most of the last 24 hours had a significant number of upper-level harmonics visible with a strong fundamental harmonic (AE) at 0.9 Hz (-68.7 dBv), which is just below the inferred resonant harmonic frequency for deep crustal energy along the Pacific and North American plate boundary in Southern California at 1 Hz. However, Acoustic Emissions overall were strong across a bandwidth from 0.9 to approximately 1.4 Hz. What appears to be a small earthquake was epicentered along the Anza Seismic Gap, and timed to be during a period of observed strong deep crustal harmonic energy (see spectrogram above, or click here).

M3.2 2004/10/19 02:12:09 UT 33.505N 116.519W d:13.4 km ( 9 mi) ESE of Anza, CA
M3.2 2004/10/19 06:11:49 UT 38.025N 118.645W d:7.6 km ( 21 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV





MT ULF UPDATE: October 19, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert is still in effect. There was another day with observed severe unclamping along the plate boundary. Extremely strong infrasonic harmonic activity was detected for most of the past 24 hours. Overall it was a broad band of fundamental deep resonant crustal energy that was very active. (see spectrogram above, or click here).

Also, the mean average ULF reading was sharply more positive.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 20, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was another day with observed severe unclamping along the plate boundary along with strong deep crustal infrasonic harmonic activity from 0.56 Hz (-65.8 dBv) Gulf of California and north for most of the past 24 hours.

M4.1 2004/10/20 11:35:15 UT 38.039N 118.608W d:4.8 km ( 19 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.9 2004/10/20 12:03:11 UT 38.039N 118.612W d:5.6 km ( 19 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.2 2004/10/20 05:19:37 UT 38.565N 115.464W d:0.0 km ( 12 mi) S of Currant, NV


ULF activity was associated with the San Jacinto and Banning faults. (see spectrogram above, or click here).

Also, the mean average ULF reading was sharply more positive.



MT ULF UPDATE: October 21, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. Today, there were observations of several short periods with geomagnetic oscillation. The ULF mean average was slightly more positive during the past 24 hours, and reached a level that was last observed in early June 2004. Unclamping was still quite active during the early part of the day. There was also another long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.56 Hz (-68.28 dBv) for the Gulf of California and north along the plate boundary. (see spectrogram above, or click here).

M3.1 2004/10/21 22:14:34 UT 38.770N 122.731W d:0.7 km ( 2 mi) W of Anderson Springs, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 22, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. Some unclamping was observed during the day. No oscillations were detected. There was another long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.06 Hz (-68.72 dBv) for the Gulf of California and north along the plate boundary.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




MT ULF UPDATE: October 23, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was another long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.66 Hz (-67.11 dBv) for the Gulf of California and north along the Pacific and North American plate boundary. (see spectrogram above, or click here).

M3.1 2004/10/23 14:16:34 UT 36.660N 121.275W d:3.7km ( 9 mi) SSE of Tres Pinos, CA
M3.4 2004/10/24 02:47:03 UT 38.772N 122.743W d:0.4km ( 3 mi) W of Anderson Springs, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 24, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a significantly strong MT pulse which was detected at approximately 12:43 UTC, or about 30 minutes prior to a small earthquake associated with the Adobe Hills CA/NV border region near the Mono Lake/Long Valley caldera.There was another long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 1.03 Hz (-67.84 dBv) for the the Pacific and North American plate boundary. Also, a Geomagnetic shift was detected which was associated with the Adobe Hills swarm.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




M3.3 2004/10/24 13:20:33 UT 38.025N 118.645W d:7.4 km ( 21 mi) SSW of Qualeys Camp, NV
M3.6 2004/10/24 23:26:07 UT 30.000N 113.811W d:10.0 km ( 93 mi) S of Puerto Peñasco, Mexico





MT ULF UPDATE: October 25, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. Late today, there was a long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a sharp peak at 1.48 Hz (-71.20 dBv) for Northern California and the PNW.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




M3.9 2004/10/25 19:55:37 UT 36.967N 121.600W d:7.9 km ( 3 mi) SSW of Gilroy, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 26, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. Late today, there was a long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a sharp peak at 0.69 Hz (-66.29 dBv) for Baja California. Also, there was a geomagnetic shift associated with the San Jacinto fault near Idyllwild, CA
(see spectrogram above, or click here).








MT ULF UPDATE: October 27, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a sharp peak at 0.68 Hz (-67.11 dBv) for Baja California and north along the plate boundary. Also, ULF activity was quite active with a mean average reading not seen since last April. Todays M3.8 epicentered near Big Bear Lake is indicative of a high crustal stress regime that is close to failure. Hence the strong infrasonics will continue without abatement.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




M3.8 2004/10/27 21:41:17 UT 34.343N 116.918W d:5.0 km (7 mi) N of town of Big Bear Lake, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 28, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a sharp peak at 0.58 Hz (-65.71 dBv) for Baja California and north along the plate boundary. Also, ULF activity was quite active with a mean average reading not seen since last mid-April.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




M3.4 2004/10/29 03:32:43 UT 35.785N 120.330W d:9.5 km ( 9 mi) NNE of Shandon, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 29, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.62 Hz (-66.62 dBv) for Baja California and north along the plate boundary. Also, local geomagnetic field oscillation was quite active and associated with a micro quake epicentered near Yucaipa and the Banning Fault branch of the San Andreas Fault Zone.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




M3.8 2004/10/29 18:02:55 UT 38.819N 122.793W d:4.2 km ( 2 mi) NNE of The Geysers, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 30, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy (and several upper level spectral lines between 4 and 6 Hz) with a peak at 1.23 Hz (-70.39 dBv) for Central California and further north along the plate boundary. Also, geomagnetic field oscillation was quite active and associated with a micro quake epicentered near Parkfield and the Cholame segment of the Central San Andreas Fault Zone.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).




M3.4 2004/10/30 16:55:16 UT 37.070N 122.269W d:7.9 km ( 9 mi) WSW of Boulder Creek, CA





MT ULF UPDATE: October 31, 2004

Note: The San Jacinto Fault Alert continues to be in effect. There was a long period with strong deep crustal infrasonic resonant harmonic energy with a peak at 0.98 Hz (-68.54 dBv) for Southern California and further north along the plate boundary. Also, there was a piezomagnetic burst associated with a micro quake epicentered near Indio along with a subsequent high frequency ULF signal burst associated with a micro quake epicentered near the Mission Creek branch of the Southern San Andreas Fault Zone.
(see spectrogram above, or click here).








MT ULF Charts and Experimental Forecast

The Latest Near Real-Time Data from GeoSeismic Labs



The most recent MT peak reading was at 8.6 units of regional lithospheric stress.


Graphic: Chart for Regional Lithospheric Stress Level

Graphic: Chart for Acoustic Emissions

Graphic: Chart for ULF STD DEV

Graphic: Recent ULF Report

Graphic: Daily Geomagnetic Field Report

Graphic: Chart for ULF Mean Average

Frank Condon,
October 31, 2004

This information is provided as a public service by GeoSeismic Labs of California, a State Registered "Not for Profit" Corporation Since 2001.


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